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Friday 20th of October 2017

CompTIA Training Companies In The UK In Detail PDF Print Email
Business - Careers
Written by: Jason Kendall   
Sunday, 05 July 2009 13:51
The CompTIA A+ course covers 4 different sectors - you'll need exam certification in two of these areas to be considered A+ competent. For this reason, most colleges restrict their A+ to just two of the four in the syllabus. To us, this is selling you short - certainly you'll have the qualification, but knowing about the others will set you apart in the workplace, where gaps in your knowledge will expose weaknesses. So that's why you need education in everything.


The CompTIA A+ course covers 4 different sectors - you'll need exam certification in two of these areas to be considered A+ competent. For this reason, most colleges restrict their A+ to just two of the four in the syllabus. To us, this is selling you short - certainly you'll have the qualification, but knowing about the others will set you apart in the workplace, where gaps in your knowledge will expose weaknesses. So that's why you need education in everything.

Courses in A+ computer training teach diagnostic techniques and fault-finding - via hands on and remote access, as well as building and fixing and understanding antistatic conditions. Should you be thinking of maintaining networks, you'll need to add Network+ to your A+ course. This qualification will enable you to assist you greatly in the job market. You may also want to consider the networking qualifications from Microsoft, i.e. MCP, MCSA MCSE.

Looking around, we find a plethora of work available in computing. Finding the particular one for you is generally problematic. Since in the absence of any commercial background in IT, how can most of us be expected to know what anyone doing a particular job actually does? Contemplation on many factors is most definitely required when you want to discover the right answer for you:

* The kind of individual you are - the tasks that you enjoy, and don't forget - what don't you like doing.

* For what reasons you're moving into computing - it could be you're looking to overcome a long-held goal such as working for yourself maybe.

* What priority do you place on job satisfaction vs salary?

* There are many ways to train in Information Technology - you'll need to gain some background information on what differentiates them.

* You'll also need to think hard about what kind of effort and commitment that you will set aside for your training.

To be honest, your only option to investigate these matters is via a conversation with an advisor or professional that understands the IT industry (and chiefly the commercial requirements.)

Review the following facts carefully if you believe the marketing blurb about 'guaranteeing' exams sounds like a benefit to the student:

It's become essential these days that we have to be a little bit more aware of sales ploys - and most of us realise that of course it is actually an additional cost to us (it's not a freebie because they like us so much!) Those who enter their exams one by one, funding them as they go are far more likely to pass first time. They are thoughtful of what they've paid and revise more thoroughly to ensure they are ready.

Look for the very best offer you can at the time, and keep hold of your own money. You'll also be able to choose where to take your exam - so you can find somewhere local. Huge profits are made by some training companies who get money upfront for exam fees. For quite legitimate reasons, a number of students don't get to do their exams but the company keeps the money. Amazingly, there are providers that depend on students not taking their exams - as that's how they make a lot of their profit. Re-takes of any failed exams with organisations who offer an 'Exam Guarantee' are monitored with tight restrictions. You'll be required to sit pre-tests until you've proven that you're likely to pass.

Exam fees averaged around the 112 pounds mark twelve months or so ago via UK VUE or Prometric centres. So why pay hundreds or thousands of pounds extra to get 'an Exam Guarantee', when common sense dictates that the best guarantee is a commitment to studying and the use of authorised exam preparation tools.

Those that are drawn to this type of work are often very practical, and don't always take well to classrooms, and poring through books and manuals. If you identify with this, go for more modern interactive training, with on-screen demonstrations and labs. Research has always verified that getting into our studies physically, is proven to produce longer-lasting and deeper memory retention.

Locate a program where you'll receive a library of DVD-ROM's - you'll be learning from instructor videos and demo's, with the facility to use virtual lab's to practice your new skills. You'll definitely want a study material demo' from the training company. You should ask for expert-led demonstrations, slideshows and interactive labs where you get to practice.

Pick physical media such as CD or DVD ROM's every time. You can then avoid all the difficulties of broadband 'downtime' or slow-speeds.

Can job security really exist anywhere now? Here in the UK, with businesses changing their mind whenever it suits, we'd question whether it does. We could however locate security at market-level, by digging for areas that have high demand, together with shortages of trained staff.

The IT skills shortfall in the UK currently stands at approximately 26 percent, as reported by the 2006 e-Skills analysis. Basically, we're only able to fill just 3 out of 4 positions in Information Technology (IT). Fully taught and commercially certified new employees are as a result at a total premium, and it's estimated to remain so for many years to come. Surely, now really is the very best time for retraining into the IT industry.

Students often end up having issues because of a single courseware aspect which doesn't even occur to them: The way the training is divided into chunks and delivered to your home. Delivery by courier of each element one piece at a time, taking into account your exam passes is how things will normally arrive. This sounds sensible, but you might like to consider this: What if you don't finish every single exam? And what if the order provided doesn't meet your requirements? Because of nothing that's your fault, you may not meet the required timescales and not receive all the modules you've paid for.

In all honesty, the very best answer is to have a copy of their prescribed order of study, but get everything up-front. You then have everything in the event you don't complete everything inside of their required time-scales.

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